Student Experience

Overview

In 2017, Dartmouth conducted our second survey on sexual misconduct and found that 42% of undergraduate women; 37% of transgender, genderqueer, and gender non-conforming undergraduates; and 9% of undergraduate men have experienced nonconsensual sexual contact since entering Dartmouth. We as a community are not okay with this, and we have an obligation to do better. In order to shift the culture on our campus, we need to do something drastically different.

Four-Year Experience

Dartmouth has taken a stand and is leading national sexual violence prevention efforts by building a comprehensive and mandatory four-year prevention and education experience for all undergraduate students. This initiative, known as the Sexual Violence Prevention Project (SVPP), is designed to challenge the culture that perpetuates harm by helping students cultivate and strengthen positive behaviors and develop the skills to:

  1. Support those who have experienced harm (i.e. sexual assault, stalking, sexual harassment, and dating violence),
  2. Develop positive relationships and sexual behaviors,
  3. Engage respectfully across difference, and
  4. Intervene to prevent harm.

 

 

Each year, students will engage in experiences aligned with the four outcomes and will come together for common experiences to discuss, connect, reflect, and put their learning into intentional and meaningful action.

Student experiences will be:

  • Research based, theory-driven, and culturally relevant
  • Created in collaboration with students
  • Timed with students’ intellectual, cognitive, and social development
  • Infused into many existing social structures
  • Inclusive of varied teaching methods to account for different learning styles
  • Focused on active skill-building


Why Do Students Participate in Multiple SVPP Experiences?

Students often ask why they participate in multiple programs related to sexual violence prevention. We truly believe students deserve to be a part of a campus community where sexual violence doesn’t happen. As a community, we need to get real about what it’s going to take to get there. We know from research that one-off programming is not effective and is not empirically shown to create widespread change. We have no interest in continuing to do something that we know doesn’t work. Research shows that to really create change, we all need to be engaging with prevention experiences that are comprehensive and are offered regularly enough to actually produce the changes we’re hoping for. This means that all Dartmouth students will be expected to participate in sexual violence prevention experiences throughout their time at Dartmouth.